Robert Tyson's Small Business Marketing Blog

Free marketing and sales ideas to grow your small business.

What Is An Ezine And Should YOUR Business Produce One?

What is an ezine?

I define an ezine (otherwise known as an ’email newsletter’, or ‘e-newsletter’) as any regular publication distributed via email for an audience who have signed up to receive it. I differentiate an ezine from a promotional email in that an ezine is made up primarily or largely of information content rather than being a pure sales message.

An ezine may be put together from scratch each time – say once a week – and/or run as a pre-prepared sequence of ‘autoresponders’.

Why produce an ezine?

The simple fact is that good ezines have been proven over many years to be hugely effective for almost any type of business, because they allow you to:

· Produce instant sales.
· Make qualified prospects come to you – at exactly the time they are ready to buy.
· Build relationships and stay and ‘top of mind’ with clients and prospects.
· Present your offerings repeatedly.
· Position yourself as an authority.
· Save time and money with an efficient and pro-active marketing tool.
· Generate instant web traffic.
· Build trust – crucial for all sales but especially high value, relationship/consultancy and online.
· Build your profile.
· Build your business’s profile.
· Ideal complement to your other marketing and sales activities, especially social media.

Despite the media’s current focus on social media, I don’t see those benefits changing any time soon – in fact, social media provides even more OPPORTUNITIES for the smart business owner to leverage their ezine.

Consider also that:

· Email is without doubt the digital medium of choice for business, all over the world.

· Email brings in over $43 for every $1 invested(source: DMA).

· 107 trillion email messages were sent in total in 2010. That works out to 294bn per day. There were nearly 2bn email users and 3bn email accounts, and the ranks of the emailing public grew by nearly 500 million. “In other words, email grew a Facebook last year!” (source: Royal Pingdom).

· Email remains one of the most popular activities on the web, reaching more than 70 per cent of the US online population each month (source: ComScore).

· The affluent older generation is increasing its email usage.In the 55-64 year old age group, the number of people accessing web-based email in the US increased 15 per cent in 2010, and the number of over 65s accessing web-based email increased too (source: ComScore).

· Email usage via mobile devices has experienced significant growth, driven largely by increased smartphone adoption. In November 2010, 70.1 million mobile users (30 per cent of all mobile subscribers) accessed email on their mobile, an increase of 36 per cent from the previous year (source: ComScore).

· Daily usage of email showed an even greater increase, growing 40 percent as 43.5 million users turned to their mobile devices on a nearly daily basis for their email communication needs (source: ComScore).

· Higher income households use email more.U.S. adults with household incomes of $75,000 or more are more likely to use email on any given day, at 78%, followed by those with household incomes of $50,000 to $74,999 at 67%; $30,000 to $49,999 at 59%; and less than $30,000 at 47%. (source: Pew internet Project).

Pretty compelling data, isn’t it?

Email as a medium is alive and well, and taking advantage of it with a regular ezine to customers and potential customers is, I believe, one of the smartest investments you can make.

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